Tagged ‘product tutorials’

How to Use Colorizers to add Color to your Digital Scrapbook Pages

July 15th, 2018 by | free stuff, tutorials | , | notes |

Are you looking for a way to add color to your digital scrapbook papers, elements, or text quickly and easily?  Are you looking for a product that you can use over and over again and still create a new look with it each time?  If you have answered yes to either of these questions, I have a new product that can help: Colorizers 01 and Colorizers 02. And, of course, I am also offering them in a value-priced Bundle.

See the Colorizers in action in this 2-minute video:

Colorizers are available at Introductory pricing here at SugarHillco!

Do you want to see how easy this is for yourself? Click on the image below to download a Colorizer Sampler

Thanks for stopping by the blog today!


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Torn Bits and a Freebie

May 19th, 2018 by | free stuff, new goods | , | 2 notes |

If you were a traditional (hands-on) scrapbooker before you switched to digital scrapbooking, you might remember when tearing the edges of your photos to create a textured edge was very popular. I always found that very hard to do because I didn’t want to destroy my original picture nor did I want to order a lot of duplicate prints.  That’s just one of the great things about digital scrapbooking. To get a duplicate of our original, we can just use the keyboard shortcut CTRL + J (just one method of creating a duplicate) to get a copy of our original photo and then be as creative as we like, while still keeping our original photo safe.

This week I set about to recreate the look of torn photographs.   My efforts resulted in 2 new products, Torn Bits 01 and Torn Bits 02.  These products were created from original cardstock, torn, scanned and meticulously extracted, as I found this was really the best way to get the realistic look I wanted.

Torn Bits come in PSD and PNG formats. To use the Torn Bits, open a PSD file in Photoshop, clip your photograph or paper to the gray layer, and experiment with Blend Modes. Hard Light, Overlay, and Soft Light generally work the best, but it depends upon the photo you are using, so experiment to see what works best for you.

In Torn Bits 01, you will see texture in the white, torn edges, while the area where you clip your photo does not have texture.

In Torn Bits 02, you will see texture both in the white torn edges and on the area where the photograph is clipped. This set also includes a few folded, worn areas to add extra charm to your photo.

Save 25% now through May 27th, or choose the Torn Bits Duo and save 40% on both products.

snickerdoodle-designs-freebie-torn-bits

snickerdoodle-designs-freebie-torn-bits

snickerdoodle-designs-freebie-torn-bits

 

 

I also have a sample for you to experiment with. Just click on the image below to download.

snickerdoodle-designs-freebie-torn-bits

 

Thanks for stopping by today!


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How to Create Stained Glass Elements

February 8th, 2018 by | tutorials | | notes |

SnickerdoodleDesigns here, with a fun product tutorial for you!

I love the look of stained glass. I am drawn to the variation in color as well as the sparkle-and-shine of the glass.  I created Stained Glass Styles 05 to help me digitally create stained glass elements, and it’s easy to do. Let’s start with this doodled flower.

For this tutorial, I am using Photoshop CC2017. Photoshop Elements user instructions are included.

How to Create Stained Glass in Photoshop

 

  1. Select the Magic Wand Tool to make it active.
  2. Click inside one of the flower petals to select it.
  3. In the top Menu Bar: Select | Modify | Expand.  The number of pixels you choose to expand will depend upon the thickness of your doodle line. I have chosen 4 pixels for this doodle. You want the new selection in the middle of the doodle line. Alternatively, once you determine the number of pixels you want to add to the selection, you could fill the image and then add a stroke of the desired expansion size. Photoshop Elements users will need to use the Stroke method because Elements does not offer the Select | Modify | Expand option.

How to Create Stained Glass in Photoshop

 

4. Create a new blank layer above the original doodle.

5. Making sure that your new blank layer is selected, choose Edit | Fill from the top Menu Bar. Any color will do. (Alternatively, you can fill using the Paint Bucket tool.)

ow to Create Stained Glass in Photoshop

6. Continue in this fashion until all of the blank spaces have been “filled, ” creating a new blank layer for each selection you make. (Putting each petal, in this case, on its own layer, allows you to manipulate the style on each individual petal if you like. For example, I resized the pattern in a few petals to give a little more variation in the final look.)

7. Move all of the “filled” layers below the original doodle.

8. Apply the Stained Glass Style that appeals to you.

8. Apply a metal Style to the doodle itself, to emulate stained glass leading. It’s that easy!

 

I used my Silver Styles for the leading.

You can find both the Silver Styles and the Stained Glass Styles 05 on sale here at SugarHillco.  I offer these products separately, but have also bundled them together for greater savings for you!


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From-the-Center Styles Tutorial

November 4th, 2017 by | tutorials | | notes |

I have never been a fan of horizontal text or other design elements placed on top of a shape that has curves or directional sections.   It doesn’t look realistic to me.  If I wanted text on a flower, for instance, I would take a piece of text, and patiently (sometimes not-so-patiently) rotate it and clip it to different parts of the flower. It was a tedious process, and not fun at all.  But from this process, my From-the-Center Styles were born. These styles were designed specifically to be used on circular, or somewhat circular, elements.

 

Here is how to get the most out of my new From-the-Center Styles

Positioning

In Photoshop:

  • Apply a style to an element
  • Double-Click on the Layer to bring up the Layer Style options
  • Click on the pattern Overlay Option on the left to make it active
  • Select the Move Tool
  • Click on your element, hold down the left key on your mouse, and move the pattern around to your liking.

In Photoshop Elements:

  • Apply a style to an element
  • Go to the top Menu Bar: Layer > Layer Style > Scale Effects. You will be able to scale the pattern on the image, but not move it around. Sometimes this works; sometimes not. It depends on the shape and size of the element you are working with.
  • The best and most flexible way for Elements users to use these Styles, is to utilize the PNGs:
    • Clip a PNG to your element
    • Select the Move tool and move position the png file where you want it.

 

TAKING IT A STEP FURTHER….

Patterns are set to Overlay Blend Mode and Scale at 50%. Both of these options can be adjusted to suit individual elements.

Patterns are not seamless, but that typically is not a concern with this style and the way it is used.

  • Experiment with Blend Modes and Opacity levels of the Styles Effect
  • Choose just certain colors to apply a style to (see example #2 below)
  • Use the Warp Tool or other distortion tools to create special effects.
  • If in Photoshop, right click on Effects on your stylized layer; choose Create Layer. This will place the pattern on its own layer above the element. In Photoshop Elements, if you are using PNGs, you already have the effect on its own layer.
    • With the effect on its own layer, you can apply a Mask, and brush away parts that you don’t want, or that don’t suit the element you are working with.

Example #1

Here is a flower with a pattern style applied. No adjustments were made here.

 

 

Here is the same image after I centered the effect, applied a mask, and removed areas of the pattern I did not want.

(GS Creations: Watercolour Garden)

 

Example #2

An additional option for Photoshop users is to go to the Top Menu Bar > Select > Color Range, and select a color.

In the flower pictured below, I selected the yellows; then Control + J to duplicate the selection; and finally applied a music style to the duplicated yellow selection to create this look:

(Wendy Page Designs, Flowers 43)

 

With some of the pinks selected:

 

Here are just a few more examples for you:

Using LouCee Creations Paper Flowers 11: I used the Quick Selection tool to select 2 flower petals; Control + J to duplicate the selection; applied a text style to the duplicated petals.

 

A Before and After, using one of LouCee Creations Pleated Flowers1

 

 

Are you a visual learner?  Here is a YouTube video for you.

Just use your imagination and you’ll be creating unique elements and effects within no time at all!

Karen Schulz
SnickerdoodleDesigns

 

 


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